Injection moulding technology has grown exponentially over the past 50 years and still has fine days ahead but must adapt to increasing energetic and ecological constraints.


In the current context of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and their adverse impact on the climate, the use of plastics is strongly criticized. Yet it seems impossible to do without because our daily life is too impregnated with them (packaging, household appliances, electronics, various equipments, ...).

Injection molding technology enables high productivity combined with unequaled freedom of design. This technology has grown exponentially over the past 50 years and still has fine days ahead but must adapt to increasing energetic and ecological constraints.

Many efforts are already made in the design of machines and ancillaries. By the way, the technique requires twice a supply of energy. One to heat and melt the material and a second to cool it as quickly as possible.

In an ideal world, it would be obvious to recover at cooling all the energy provided during heating. For this purpose it is necessary to minimize the losses as much as possible. These are lying at all levels of the manufacturing process: losses in the heating barrel, losses in the tooling, losses in the coolant lines, … .

The present paper  focuses exclusively on the tooling part that is out of the scope of the machine suppliers and evaluates the potential interest in isolating the injection molds.