We are on the verge of a full-fledged revolution: AI evolves rapidly and the opportunities for innovation in a myriad of multi-faceted applications are enormous. From a legal point of view however, the technology presents important and often quite specific challenges. During the seminar on 7 May, five legal experts will look into the major legal issues in the field of AI.


Agoria and Sirris support enterprises as regards their technological developments, in particular in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). After all, we are on the verge of a full-fledged revolution: AI evolves rapidly and the opportunities for innovation in a myriad of multi-faceted applications are enormous.

Online search engines, chatbots and personal assistants are already part of our everyday life and in the future the impact of AI will only expand because of autonomous systems such as self-driving cars and autonomous drones. The manufacturing industry considers the technology as one of the essential pillars of the fourth industrial revolution (4IR), and learning algorithms make more and more of the decisions in for example the banking and health sector.

From a legal point of view however, the technology presents important and often quite specific challenges.

During the seminar on 7 May, five legal experts will look into the major legal issues in the field of AI. The seminar is intended for all enterprises that come into contact with AI, and will be held in English.

5 experts share their point of view

1/ As an introduction, Sari Depreeuw sheds light on the legal questions that AI applications raise. 

Legal machine learning: limits to the flexibility of the law
Sari Depreeuw, Partner, DALDEWOLF – professor at USLB

The automated and (semi) autonomous processing of large quantities of data challenges fundamental concepts in several fields of law (such as liability, intellectual property or competition law).  To a certain extent, technological evolutions can be accommodated within the boundaries of the existing law.  The question is whether the technology has reached the point of requiring legislative intervention.   

2/ During the second part, Mireille Buydens will comment on AI and intellectual property right issues. 

Artificial intelligence and intellectual property : who will get the benefits?
Mireille Buydens, Partner at Janson law firm, professor at the University of Brussels (ULB)

AI creates art, and it sells. AI can also invent devices, improve formulations or develop medicines – alone or together with human beings. Are these results protectable? Who will get the IP rights? What is the impact of AI on our intellectual property system?

3/ The third part is a presentation on the liability issues in relation to AI applications by Brahim Benichou and Maxime Colle.

Artificial intelligence and legal liability : Who has to pay for the robot's misconduct?
Brahim Benichou and Maxime Colle, Of Counsels at NautaDutilh

Robots and AI based applications are – to a certain extent – capable of taking decisions autonomously and have the ability to learn. By interacting with their environment and with humans, robots and AI applications can cause harm. The question is who must be held liable for such damages caused by robots and AI applications? Existing tort law can in some instances be applied to determine liability for damages resulting from AI misconduct. However, the more sophisticated AI will be, the louder the call for appropriate legislative intervention will become. Closely linked to the issue of liability and repairing for damages resulting from robots and AI is the debate on electronic personality (legal personality for robots

4/ During the fourth presentation, Hans Graux provides clarifications regarding the use of data, of both a personal and non-personal nature.

Robot logic: how does an AI use your data, and is that a problem?
Hans Graux, Partner at Timelex law firm

Artificial intelligence is everywhere already, in every cloud based service that we use. But most of the really drastic innovations are still ahead of us. Is the law ready? The GDPR was – depending on who you ask – either a big step forward in protecting your personal data, or a huge barrier to European innovation. And what about non-personal data? How will new initiatives such as the Cybersecurity Act and the Regulation on the Free Flow of Non-Personal Data affect AI development and use cases? This session will provide a pragmatic overview of legislation affecting data security, both for personal and non-personal data.

Programme 

13h00

Welcome

Agoria & Sirris

13h20

Legal machine learning :  limits to the flexibility of the law

Sari Depreeuw

14h00

Artificial intelligence and intellectual property : who will get the benefits?

Mireille Buydens

14h50

Break

 

15h20

Artificial intelligence and legal liability : Who has to pay for the robot's misconduct?

Brahim Benichou & Maxime Colle

16h10

Robot logic: how does an AI use your data, and is that a problem?

Hans Graux

17h00  

Conclusions

Agoria & Sirris

17h15

Drink (until 18h00)

 

Date

Tuesday 7 May 2019, 13:00 - 18:00

Location

BluePoint Brussels
Bd A. Reyers 80
1030 Brussels

Organizer

Agoria en Sirris 

More info

- Free for members of Agoria and/or Sirris
- Members of AI4Belgium: 70 EUR (excl. VAT)
- Others: 150 EUR (excl. VAT)

Dit evenement is afgelopen.